Probably green, since lemons are common objects in daily life we tend to observe them in daylight conditions often. Based on their bright yellow color (relative to daylight brightness of e.g. white paper) they probably reflect a large part of the spectrum that gives a yellow color, i.e. from red(~600nm) to green(~540nm) wavelengths.

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This means under most green lights the lemon will probably be a slightly darker (less luminous) green than the source light--but still green.


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